Thursday, August 18, 2016

Writing Supplement For Third Grade & Up: Imitation in Writing Fairy Tales

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Reading and writing are my favorite subjects to learn and teach! While we've always used Bob Jones English for our core grammar and writing curriculum, I've tried to add in supplements for creative writing as well. Since I love fairy tales, I chose Imitation in Writing Fairy Tales by Matt Whitling as one of our writing supplements.

We've all heard that famous Charles Caleb Colton quote, "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery," right? It makes sense because we're all probably guilty of imitating someone or something at some point in our lives. Hello, Pinterest. Well, imitation is also a method of learning used in many subjects like art, music, and so on but is often neglected when it comes to teaching writing. While it's great to be a pioneer and pave the way for something new, the tool of imitation can provide a solid educational foundation on which to build. Imitation in Writing Fairy Tales is a fun way to give kids that foundation and to help them improve their writing skills.

Imitation in Writing is actually a series originally developed for Logos School in Moscow, Idaho. Fairy Tales is the second book in the series. Twenty fairy tales are included in the book, and each fairy tale is accompanied by a worksheet in which the child defines vocabulary words from the fairy tale, outlines the basic plot, and briefly describes characters. Each fairy tale is divided into 3 sections making it easier to outline the plot. An answer key is provided for all 20 fairy tale plot outlines.

The following photos are examples of a fairy tale, a worksheet, and and answer key:




Once the worksheet is finished and your child is familiar with the original fairy tale, he/she can begin rewriting the fairy tale using the completed worksheet as a guide. The child can change the characters and minor details pertaining to the original fairy tale, but the overall plot should be imitated. Also, he/she needs to incorporate all of the vocabulary words from the original tale into their own tale. It was always so fun to see how my kids would retell the tales in their own words and how they'd change characters and little details to make the stories their own.

The 20 fairy tales included in this writing supplement are:

  • Why the Bear has a Stumpy Tail
  • The Princess and the Pea
  • The Fox and the Horse
  • Ali and the Sultan's Saddle
  • The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean
  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff
  • The Pied Piper of Hamelin
  • The Queen Bee
  • The Golden Goose
  • The Man in the Bag
  • The Emperor's New Clothes
  • King Grizzle Beard
  • The Fisherman and his Wife
  • Rapunzel
  • Old Sultan
  • The Mouse, the Bird, and the Sausage
  • The Elves and the Cobbler
  • The Wolf and the Seven Little Kids
  • The Three Children of Fortune
  • The Frog Prince

I personally introduce this particular writing supplement around third grade and use it until about fifth grade. I waited a little longer for my third child, though. I only assign one fairy tale every month or two since we already have a core writing curriculum, and I give my children a break from literature while they are working on a fairy tale, so they don't get too overwhelmed with multiple subjects.


If fairy tales aren't your thing, Imitation in Writing offers a few other titles to choose from: Aesop's Fables, Greek Myths, Greek Heroes, and Medieval Legends. Click the links below to check them out!

 

Please feel free to ask any questions you may have about this writing supplement that our family has enjoyed. :)

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1 comment:

The Forever Joyful Homeschool said...

I've only recently become acquainted with Imitation in Writing and would like to learn more. Thanks for highlighting this curriculum at the #LMMLinkup.

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